Apple's new app rules tighten grip on China's tipping

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Chinese app-developers argue that users are simply showing their appreciation by tipping the authors of articles or other content or service providers, but Apple believes tipping is just like buying a song or a piece of video. As he said in his blog, "I was one Touch ID away from a $400 A MONTH subscription to reroute all my internet traffic to a scammer".

As for how developers are gaining such traction with seemingly fake apps, Lin explains that many are manipulating App Store search ads to do so. Of course, thanks to iOS sandboxing and other security features, malware isn't a significant issue in Apple's mobile operating system.

Apple has modified its App Store policies and will now allow tipping for content publishers through in-app purchases, reports TechCrunch. "It's downright mind boggling that this horrendous "Mobile protection:Clean & Security VPN" app made it all the way into the top 10 without getting flagged", he added.

The latest design offers separate tabs for games and apps.

Top Charts had a ripple effect on the increasing popularity of featured apps or viral apps therefore demoting it to a second click will impact burst campaigns that developers did for user acquisition and may even dilute the effect of charts induced virality. However, he also notes that at the exorbitant prices the app charged, it would only need around 200 subscribers to get to that amount.

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The cartoon stoner amphibian, adopted as a mascot by the alt-right, is not so much deplorable as he is "objectionable" by Apple standards, and the company has rejected a new game app featuring Pepe. However, some social-networking apps have likened Apple's tactic to arm-twisting, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Apple has been notoriously opaque about its review process, which has been a source of frustration to many developers over the years.

"Given the bad title of this app", Lin writes, "I was sure this was a bug in the rankings algorithm".

And perhaps more importantly, their subscription fees start from $4.54 per month; around 1/20 of the fee for this scam app on the US App Store. "The App Store sandboxing rules mean that anti-virus software couldn't really do anything useful anyway". Unfortunately, Apple has no filter to sift through search ads as of now. The answer, apparently, is search ads.

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