Bangladesh Protests Myanmar Airspace Violations as Tensions Mount Over Rohingya

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Swaraj, he said, told the Bangladesh premier that the crisis by now appeared as an global issue while India was trying to put "pressure bilaterally and multilaterally on Myanmar to stop persecution on ethnic minority Rohingya Muslims" and take back the refugees who fled to Bangladesh.

Dujarric said the first 15 of 35 scheduled trucks of aid provided by the United Nations refugee agency arrived in Cox's Bazaar on Friday, while other agencies are airlifting their supplies into Bangladesh.

The Rohingyas began pouring into the Bangladesh side of the border following army crackdown against the community in response to attacks by the Rohingya insurgents on 30 police posts and an army base on August 25.

Myanmar must acknowledge the Rohingyas as their nationals, she said.

While almost 400,000 refugees have poured across the border into Bangladesh, fears have also been growing of a humanitarian crisis on the Myanmar side, but access for aid workers and reporters has been severely restricted.

"They can not travel from one place to another by roads, railways or waterways", the order said, adding bus and lorry drivers and workers have been asked not to carry the Rohingya.

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"There are still, we believe, thousands of people waiting to take boats across to Cox's Bazar".

Myanmar rejects the accusations, saying its security forces are carrying out clearance operations to defend against the insurgents of the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, which claimed responsibility for the August 25 attacks and similar, though smaller, attacks in October. We are also concerned about reports of extensive loss of life of civilians and the vast suffering that is producing the displacement of thousands of people from their homes and livelihoods.

At least 26 villages had been hit by arson attacks in the Rohingya majority region, the rights group said, with patches of grey ash picked up in photos marking the spot where homes had once stood. It was not clear what was burning or who set the fires.

"The Royingya refugees won't be allowed to go outside the camp", Bangladeshi Minister of Home Affairs Asaduzzaman Khan said on September 10.

Elsewhere along Myanmar's borders, where ethnic rebel groups and government troops have been fighting, civilians from other ethnic and religious minorities have also been forced to flee for safety over the last few monhts.

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