Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

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They are asking anyone who is concerned their nude images might be shared on the social media platform [VIDEO] to send them the images. The company is testing a program in Australia that would mark each picture as non-consensual explicit material. CNBC reports Facebook's anti-revenge porn pilot program is available in the USA, U.K., and Canada.

It seems Australians are having problems with #Revenge Porn, or to give it a more official title, "image-based abuse".

On Facebook's part getting a nude photo from a users, analysing it - hashing it is the technical word - will help the website pre-empt the abuse of users.

The pilot scheme, which is now being rolled out on a trail basis, will see users complete an online form on the e-safety commissioner's website.

The Australian Office of the eSafety Commissioner announced they were partnering with the social media giant last week on a pilot scheme that will allow anyone to report sensitive images being shared online without their permission.

PixabayHow does this anti Revenge Porn tool work?

"[Facebook] thought of many different ways about doing this and they came to the conclusion as one of the major technology companies in the world that this was the safest way for users to share the digital footprints", Ms Inman Grant said.

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"Conceptually the idea has merit but it would work better if the user was provided a self-service tool to accomplish the task and upload the file up to a Facebook portal", One Identity EMEA director, Andrew Clarke told Infosecurity.

The new method is being practiced in Australia, the US, the United Kingdom and Canada as a preventative tool in combating sextortion.

According to Facebook, the unwanted images will be stored for a short period of time before they are then deleted, to ensure the policy is being enforced correctly.

Grant went on to reassure everyone that Facebook is not storing the images, but is merely storing a link or digital fingerprint to the images. "Unfortunately, the issue of revenge porn, or unwanted distribution of compromising photos isn't one that can be solved by technology alone".

While there are many high-profile revenge porn cases, such as the Blac Chyna-Kardashian case that is now making its way through the courts, there are also many cases that go unreported.

Also, if you're anxious about more than one explicit picture of you being posted to the site, you'd have to upload all of them to Messenger.

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