Borough MP resigns junior shadow minister role over Brexit second referendum vote

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She had been forced to offer MPs a vote on delaying Brexit after they rejected her withdrawal agreement by a large margin, for a second time, and then voted to reject a no-deal Brexit.

Alternatively, there could be a much longer delay, requiring the United Kingdom to take part in elections for the European Parliament in May, the prime minister has said, in the event her deal is not approved. Listen to the full conversation here.

An MP from the borough has stepped down from her post as a junior shadow minister after voting against an amendment on a second Brexit referendum.

May has said she will hold another vote next week on her deal, although lawmakers have already rejected it twice.

Downing Street believes that with the support of the DUP's 10 MPs, Eurosceptic MPs can be outnumbered when the third meaningful vote takes place on Tuesday. However this will require unanimous agreement from the 27 leaders, which is not guaranteed as the EU's chief negotiator and several leaders, including French President Emmanuel Macron, have said there would need to be a good reason given.

European Union officials have raised the stakes in Theresa May's extension dilemma ahead of Thursday's leaders' summit, piling pressure on MPs to back her deal now or face a long and uncertain Brexit delay.

"The outlook remains uncertain because we don't know how long the delay will be and whether the European Union will approve it", Seko said.

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Talks are continuing with the Democratic Unionist Party, which said there were "still issues to be discussed" with ministers about the deal and the contentious Irish backstop measures.

The short delay envisaged in the motion could last until June 30, but the longer extension is not now time-limited.

European Commission vice-president Frans Timmermans indicated that any extension to Article 50 could be a two-stage process, initially limited to a few weeks unless Mrs May could set out what she wanted to achieve with the extra time.

British parliament will on Thursday vote on an amendment that seeks to decide whether Brexit should be delayed to have another referendum.

In what pro-EU supporters said was a metaphor for his decision to walk away from the fallout of Brexit, Farage said he wouldn't be completing the full two-week walk to London but would instead join campaigners for about a third of it.

The People's Vote campaign, the main movement calling for another referendum, did not want the option brought before parliament, saying it was premature to move now - knowing it would be defeated.

Discussing the no-deal Brexit that numerous marchers are calling for, he said: "The impact that will have on businesses and on prices, and on the availability of things like medicines and so forth, it doesn't bear thinking about".

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