Investigators say anti-stall system activated before Ethiopian Airlines crash

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737 Max planes were grounded worldwide after two of the jets crashed within the past five months, killing 345 people.

"[Boeing officials] have to discuss the matter internally", said Garuda Indonesia president director Ari Askhara in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Friday, as reported by Antara.

The company said numerous updates were made in the last two weeks, after an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed March 10 and killed all 157 aboard.

Boeing's bestselling craft has been grounded globally amid ongoing investigations and lawsuits.

He vowed that Garuda Indonesia did not plan to shift its order to another aircraft maker but ask Boeing to offer the airline other types of aircraft. Data showed that the Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes were eerily similar, although final reports have not been released for either incident and a direct link could not be established as a result.

However, the travel giant also warned that, should it not become clear within the coming weeks that flying the 737 Max will resume by mid-July, it will need to extend the measures until the end of the summer season. "We are evaluating whether we will shift to Airbus or keep Boeing", he added.

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On Thursday, a lawsuit against Boeing was filed in Chicago federal court by the family of Jackson Musoni, a citizen of Rwanda and United Nations employee who died in the Ethiopian Airlines crash.

Air-crash experts have been using flight-data and cockpit-voice recordings recovered from the Ethiopian Airlines wreckage to piece together events leading up to the tragedy, which killed all 157 people on board.

There's no explanation of the MCAS - nor the steps needed to counter it - in the Max's US and European pilot manuals.

Boeing said the changes ensure pilots will always have the ability to override the automated flight system and manually control the airplane, when needed.

However, the published flight manual did not reference these "unusual" situations, according to a copy from American Airlines seen by Reuters, with tragic consequences and an overall death toll of 346 lives. Boeing's 737 Max 10 has not yet entered service and it's unclear whether it will also receive the updates.

"We've revised our base-case timeline for the groundings to around two months because this MCAS fix appears mature, the MCAS upgrade should only take one hour per plane, and the updates will not require significant training", he wrote in a note. Boeing was close to a software fix when the Ethiopian Airlines jet went down on March 10.

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